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Main Parts

[1] backstay: the wire between the stern and mast, which keeps the mast fixed
[2] boom: horizontal pole that holds the bottom of the mainsail
[3] boom: vang
line that keeps the boom at right angles to the mast
[4] batten: elastic horizontal peace that support mainsail
[5] bow:
the front (pointy) end of the boat
[6] forestay:
the wire between the bow and mast, which keeps the mast fixed
[7] genoa: large foresail that overlaps the mainsail
[8] head:
the upper corner of a triangular sail
[9] hull:
the main body of a vessel
[10] keel: underwater fin attached to the hull that provides stability
[11] lifeline: cable fence around the deck
[12] mainsail:
the sail set on the mainmast and boom
[13] mainsheet: the line that controls the boom
[14] mast:
a spar set upright to support rigging and sails
[15] propeller: engine propelling device with blades
[16] rudder:
a vertical plate or board for steering a boat
[17] shroud:
run from the top of the mast to both sides of the hull
[18] stern:
the back end of a boat, usually the square end
[19] wheel: device used for turning/maneuvering boat
[20] winch: cylindrical device used for tightening lines and sails

 

 

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The angle between a sailboat's directions and the true wind is referred to as points of sailing. The points of sailing are divided into three main categories: running, reaching and sailing upwind.

Running - sailing with the wind blowing from behind. The true angle of wind matches the heading of the boat.

Reaching - is sailing with the wind blowing across the boat. On a broad reach the wind blows at an angle of 45 degrees over the transom.

Upwind - is sailing towards the wind. The goal is to point the boat as high as possible towards the wind, at approximately 30 degrees away from true wind .

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